Posts tagged history
Sister Olive Trees of Noah

The Sisters or The Sisters Olive Trees of Noah are a grove of sixteen olive trees in the Lebanese town of Bcheale.

According to the local’s, the trees are at least 5,000 years old, perhaps 6,000 years old or older.

The Sisters as the source of the olive branch returned to Noah's Ark at the waning of the Biblical Flood. The trees still produce olives, and a preservation effort was undertaken by the non-profit organization Sisters Olive Oil, which marketed oil from these olives.

If you would like any further information or would like to visit the Sister trees please email nicola@explorelebanontours.com

Saint Nimatullah of Hardine

Saint Nimatullah was born Youssed Kassab in 1808 and died in 1858. Kassab was a Lebanese Monk, Priest and Scholar of the Maronite church.

After his studies he entered the Monastery of St Anthony, where they gave him the name Nimatullah which means “The Grace of God” .

As a monk, Kassab spent his entire life in prayer and the service of his order. Kassab is believed to have performed many miracles during his life due to his deep spirituality and his high virtues. He is commended for having a radiant soul and is was said that he was deeply united to his creator “The Saint of Kfifan” was stated to have the gift of prophesy and hence became know as “a man of vision”

In 1864 his tomb was opened for re-burial and to the surprise of the monks, his body was found to be intact. His body was exposed to the veneration of the public until 1927.

Kassab was canonized on the 16th May 2004 By Pope John Paul II.

If you would like further information or would like to Visit Saint Nimatullah please email nicola@explorelebanontours.com OR visit www.explorelebanontours.com

Anjar, Lebanon

Anjar is a town of Lebanon located in the Bekaa Valley. The population is 2,400, consisting almost entirely of Armenians.

The ruins reveal a very regular layout, reminiscent of the palace-cities of ancient times, and are a unique testimony to city planning under the Umayyads. The site of this ancient city was only discovered by archaeologists at the end of the 1940s. The ruins are dominated by spectacular vestiges of a monumental tetrapyle, as well as by the walls and colonnades of the Umayyad palace, three levels of which have been preserved. These structures incorporate decorative or architectonical elements of the Roman era, but are also noteworthy for the exceptional plasticity of the contemporary decor within the construction.

If you would like further information or would like to Visit Anjar please email nicola@explorelebanontours.com OR visit www.explorelebanontours.com

Faqra Ruins, Kfardebian

Faqra is an archaeological site in Kfardebian, with Roman and Byzantine ruins with an altitude of 1500m. It is one of the most important sites of the UNESCO listed Nahr Al-Kalb Valley.

The Ruins include a temple to Zaus Beelgalasos a sanctuary of Atargastis dedicated to Agrippa ll and his sister Berenice, two altars and a tower with a 16m square base built in 44 A.D.

If you would like further information on the Ruins in Faqra, you can email nicola@explorelebanontours.com OR visit www.explorelebanontours.com